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RESTORE THE COMMANDMENTS

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THE PETITION:

"We the people of Alabama and these United States petition you, as Chief Justice and as Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of Alabama, to restore the Ten Commandments monument to the prominent place in the Alabama Judicial Building where it previously was displayed. With the now overturned Lemon test, the monument would not have been removed in 2003. We are calling on you to Restore the Commandments."

Justices of Supreme Court of Alabama:

Chief Justice

  • Hon. Thomas F. Parker, IV

Associate Justices​​
  • Hon. Greg Shaw     

  • Hon. Greg Cook

  • Hon. Tommy Bryan

  • Hon. Jay Mitchell

  • Hon. Alisa Kelli Wise

  • Hon. Sarah H. Stewart

  • Hon. Brady E. Mendheim, Jr.

  • Hon. William B. Sellers   

SIGN THE PETITION!

To restore the Ten Commandments Monument in the Alabama Judicial Building!

Petition Submitted! Email Confirmation Sent!

WHO WE ARE

OUR VISION

Our strength relies on the Word of God, and the respect for this Constitutional Republic. We know it is time to Restore the Commandments and reverse the secular destruction of this Country which removed Ten Commandment monuments from public spaces. Recent legal ruling opened the doors needed to restore monuments across America! By working together the body of believers can overcome challenges more efficiently, and this is why we ultimately know it's our duty to Restore the Commandments.

CASE HISTORY:

RELIGIOUS LIBERTY ON TRIAL

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MASSIVE RELIGIOUS WIN!

Kennedy v. Bremerton School District, 2022

THE PATH FORWARD:

First Liberty Attorney, Kelly Shackelford, May 2023

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UNCONSTITUTIONAL REMOVAL

Glassroth v. Moore, 2003

CASE HISTORY:

LEMON v. KURTZMAN

June 28, 1971

The question before the Court was whether Pennsylvania and Rhode Island statutes providing state aid to church-related elementary and secondary schools was constitutional under the Establishment and Free Exercise Clauses of the First Amendment and the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

The Court set out a 3 prong test which became known as the Lemon test. If any one of the three prongs is violated, the statute under review must be ruled unconstitutional.

  • A statute must have a secular legislative purpose;

  • Its principal or primary effect must be one that neither advances nor inhibits religion; or

  • The statute cannot promote "an excessive government entanglement with religion"

KENNEDY v. BREMERTON School District

June 27, 2022

Joseph Kennedy lost his job as a high school football coach in the Bremerton School District when he knelt at midfield after games to offer a quiet personal prayer. 

The U.S. Supreme Court held: The Free Exercise and Free Speech Clauses of the First Amendment protect an individual engaging in a personal religious observance from government reprisal; the Constitution neither mandates nor permits the government to suppress such religious expression.

In place of Lemon and the endorsement test, this Court has instructed that the Establishment Clause must be interpreted by reference to "historical practices and understandings"... An analysis focused on original meaning and history, this Court has stressed, has long represented the rule rather than some "exception"" within the "Court's Establishment Clause jurisprudence."

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GLASSROTH v. MOORE

November 18, 2002

In the forced removal of the Ten Commandments monument from the Alabama State Judicial Building the Supreme Court used Lemon v. Kurtzman: ... (the Court determined) the monument failed the Lemon test, in two ways:

(1) fundamental purpose in displaying the monument was non-secular; and

(2) the monument's primary effect advances religion.

If the Supreme Court errs, no other court may correct it... which the Court did correct itself in Kennedy v. Bremerton School District (2022), which replaced the Lemon test).

1st Amendment

December 15, 1791

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
Note:  This amendment, along with Nine other amendments were ratified on December 15, 1791, and form the first Ten Amendments to the United States Constitution, which are known as the “Bill of Rights.”

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